Table 1 - List of Barriers - Triggering Question: "What are barriers to what "ought to be done" for all students to learn math?"



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1: ACCOMMODATIONS OR INSTRUCTIONAL APPROACHES DO NOT MEET STUDENT NEEDS (LEARNING STYLE, LANGUAGE, OR SPEC. ED. NEEDS)
2: NEED FOR TEACHING STAFF TO BE WILLING TO MOVE AWAY FROM TRADITIONAL TEACHING STRATEGIES IN ORDER TO TEACH ALL STUDENTS
3: BEING UNABLE TO USE DATA AS A MEANS TO GUIDE INSTRUCTION AND LEARNING AND NOT TO PASS JUDGMENT ON A SPECIFIC TEACHER
4: RELIANCE ON PARA PROFESSIONALS TO WORK WITH HIGH NEEDS STUDENTS INSTEAD OF HAVING THE MOST QUALIFIED TEACHERS WORKING WITH THEM
5: LOCAL CONTROL IN SCHOOL DISTRICTS
6: LACK OF FINANCIAL RESOURCES TO INVEST IN A COMPLETE OVERHAUL OF OUR MATH INSTRUCTION SYSTEM - E.G. BOOKS, SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS AND TEACHER TRAINING
7: LACK OF QUALITY TIME TO PROPERLY PREPARE DAILY LESSONS
8: INADEQUATE TEACHER MATH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE
9: LOW PERFORMANCE EXPECTATIONS
10: NEED FOR TEACHER TRAINING PROCESS TO BUILD COMMON UNDERSTANDING ABOUT BEST PRACTICE MATH INSTRUCTION
11: INCREASED EMPHASIS ON SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS TO MATH
12: NEED FOR RESTRUCTURING OF LEARNING TIME FOR STUDENTS
13: MOST DATA AVAILABLE FOR TEACHERS IS NOT ACTIONABLE AT THE CLASSROOM LEVEL
14: LACK OF EDUCATIONALLY KNOWLEDGEABLE BOARD MEMBERS
15: ENTRENCHED AND OUTDATED VIEWS OF HOW AN EDUCATION SYSTEM SHOULD LOOK
16: TEACHERS LACK OWNERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
17: TEACHERS LACK THE CLASSROOM TIME NECESSARY TO OFFER DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION
18: THE SCHOOL YEAR IS TOO SHORT
19: LACK OF TIME FOR TEACHERS TO WORK IN K-12 COMMUNITIES IN ORDER TO FOCUS ON MATH INSTRUCTION
20: THE NEED FOR ASSESSMENT DATA TO BE COMPILED EFFICIENTLY AND IN A TIMELY MANNER SO AS TO BE BENEFICIAL TO EDUCATORS (DELETE)
21: LOW EXPECTATIONS FOR TEACHERS TO SELF-IDENTIFY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEEDS
22: LACK OF TEACHER KNOWLEDGE REGARDING FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT
23: LACK OF REFLECTION TIME FOR TEACHERS TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF LESSONS
24: TOO MUCH CONTENT TO GET THROUGH SO THAT STUDENTS CAN TRULY UNDERSTAND CONCEPTS
25: LOW PARENTAL EXPECTATIONS FOR THEIR CHILDREN TO SUCCEED IN MATH
26: LACK OF PRACTITIONER AND PROFESSIONAL INVOLVEMENT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATION POLICY
27: NEED FOR PARENT INVOLVEMENT IN TRAINING FOR BEST PRACTICE INSTRUCTION AND UNDERSTANDING STUDENT LEARNING OF MATH
28: THE BELIEF THAT STUDENTS ONLY NEED BASIC MATH SKILLS
29: THE NEED FOR ASSESSMENT DATA TO BE COMPILED EFFICIENTLY AND IN A TIMELY MANNER SO AS TO BE BENEFICIAL TO EDUCATORS
30: TOO MANY EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS NEED TO COMMUNICATE AND COLLABORATE
31: LACK OF VARIOUS ABILITIES AND DESIRES OF TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS TO ADDRESS STUDENT NEEDS
32: LACK OF BELIEF THAT ALL STUDENTS CAN OR SHOULD LEARN MATHEMATICS
33: LACK OF REAL WORLD INPUT INTO WHAT REAL AND RELEVANT APPLICATIONS OUGHT TO BE TAUGHT
34: RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF SUBJECTS IS UNDULY IMPACTED BY POLICY SET BY FORCES OUTSIDE THE SCHOOL DISTRICT I.E NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND
35: LACK OF SUPPORTIVE AND MEANINGFUL MATH PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR TEACHERS WHO ARE NOT COMFORTABLE WITH MATH
36: INABILITY OF PARENTS AND TEACHERS TO ALLOW STUDENT FRUSTRATIONS IN ORDER TO LEARN MATHEMATICS
37: NOT USING A GUARANTEED AND VIABLE CURRICULUM WITH FIDELITY
38: LACK OF EXPECTATION FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF BEST PRACTICES LEARNED IN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
39: DISAGREEMENT BETWEEN MEMBERS OF THE MATH COMMUNITY REGARDING MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTION
40: SHORTAGE OF HIGHLY QUALIFIED INSTRUCTORS
41: TOO LITTLE TECHNOLOGY IN THE HANDS OF STUDENTS
42: INADEQUATE OR INAPPROPRIATE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AVAILABLE
43: THE PERVASIVE DISPROPORTIONATE EMPHASIS ON LANGUAGE SKILLS PRESCHOOL THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL
44: LACK OF SUSTAINABILITY PLAN TO CONTINUE WHAT WAS STARTED
45: THE INEQUITIES OF SCHOOL FUNDING
46: LACK OF APPROPRIATE STUDENT/TEACHER RATIO
47: INSTRUCTIONAL AND ASSESSMENT RESOURCES THAT ARE ALIGNED TO STATE EXPECTATIONS ARE NOT AVAILABLE TO ALL TEACHERS
48: THE MISDIRECTED MINDSET OF ASSESSMENT OF MANY PARENTS, STUDENTS AS WELL AS TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS
49: LACK OF KNOWLEDGE AT THE SCHOOL LEVEL ABOUT GOOD INSTRUCTION IN GENERAL AND MATHEMATICS IN PARTICULAR
50: NEED FOR FLUIDITY OF CLASSES TO MEET STUDENT NEEDS
51: TEACHER PREPARATION LEAVES TEACHERS UNPREPARED TO MEET THE NEEDS OF A DIVERSE STUDENT BODY
52: DATA USED TO MEASURE PROGRESS (AYP) DOES NOT COME FROM A VERTICAL MEASURE OF PROFICIENCIES
53: INCONSISTENCY OF CONTENT EXPECTATIONS FROM THE STATE AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FROM YEAR TO YEAR
54: INCONSISTENT EXPECTATIONS FOR TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS ACROSS THE STATE OR THE NATION
55: SLOW RESPONSE FROM INSTITUTES OF HIGHER EDUCATION TO CHANGE AND TO MEET STATE, DISTRICT, AND POPULATION NEEDS
56: ATTITUDES AND BELIEFS THAT LEAD TO LOW EXPECTATION OF POOR AND AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS
57: MATH INTERVENTION AND ENRICHMENT TIME IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR ALL STUDENTS WITHOUT MISSING NEW LEARNING WITHIN THE OFFICIAL SCHOOL DAY
58: LACK OF SUSTAINABLE FOLLOW UP IN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
59: LACK OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR PARENTS TO LEARN AND UNDERSTAND MATH EXPECTATIONS
60: LACK OF COLLABORATION AND COHESIVE ACTION PLANNING BETWEEN ESSENTIAL DISTRICT ADMINISTRATORS AROUND MATH (SPECIAL ED, BILINGUAL, ETC...)
61: THE LACK OF COMMON LANGUAGE AND KNOWLEDGE OF WHAT BALANCED ASSESSMENT IS
62: TOO LITTLE IS DONE FIRST TO BUILD RELATIONSHIPS AND MEET STUDENT SOCIAL NEEDS BEFORE TEACHING MATH
63: THERE IS A DISCONNECT BETWEEN COLLEGE PROFESSORS THAT ARE TEACHING THE MATH ED CLASSES AND THE K-12 CLASSROOMS OF TODAY